Highlights From Our Event: Navigating the Ethical Pitfalls of Social Media

by Mike Mintz on January 26, 2010 · 1 comment

in Martindale-Hubbell Connected

The proliferation of social media as a vital tool in business and personal communication presents many ethical traps for lawyers and their clients.  As we asked in our event preview post:

  • Do conflicts of interest dictate who makes your friend-list?
  • How much can you discuss your current business without violating confidentiality?
  • Can posts on social media sites violate lawyer advertising rules?

Underlying all of these questions is how can a good social media policy prevent problems?

Join the Social Media Policy group in Martindale-Hubbell Connected to have access to the resources that follow.  Also, you’ll be able to network with some of the top voices in social media ethics and policy today as we explore the spectrum of ethical issues that affect lawyers and other business professionals, suggest practical tips for avoiding problems, and provide a framework for analyzing new situations which may arise. 

Registration for Martindale-Hubbell Connected is required, but it’s free and easy, so what are you waiting for!

register now button

Here are some exclusive Connected posts from our event:

Competing Interest of Open v Closed Networks by Gwynne Monahan – this blog post generated over 30 comments so far.  Add yours!

Judge/Lawyer “Friending”: Perception is everything … right? By Tobias Butlercomment on this analysis of a very important and uncertain issue.

Commenting for Clients by James S. Wong - share your take on whether an attorney may disclose an opinion about a client when asked by a third party.  Assuming that the client gives permission, is the attorney required to comment?  If commenting, how much can be disclosed?

How Online Investigative Tactics Can Lead to Online Ethical Violations by Donna Seyle – this post asks questions like: “Is employing someone to “friend” a potential witness that different from hiring a private investigator to videotape a party or witness? Is advising a client to shut down his Facebook account different from advising him not to talk to anyone about the case? What do you do when a client tells you there is evidence on a social networking site that could corroborate her story? Or impeach a witness? Do you get it any way you can?  Would you be committing malpractice if you didn’t?”  Post your answer in the comments.

Your Online Profile by Priya Marwah Doornbos – this post looks into the “two major issues that attorneys should be aware of when it comes to their online profile: (1) the substance of what goes into your profile, i.e. the different fields on the various websites that you fill out to create your profile; and (2) attorney ethics rules that come into play with your online profile.”  Post your thoughts about online profiles.

Follow the Social Media Policy Group Blog to be the first to comment on an upcoming posts by Adrian Dayton on Ghost Blogging!

E-Book Ambitions – the event leaders and Connected staff will be working on developing an e-book based on the webinar presentations, blog posts, and community feedback received.  Look for it in the Social Media Policy group File Library towards the end of March 2010!

Members-Only: Free CLE Webinar*
Log into Connected to access our registration page for a free CLE Webinar taking place on Wednesday, January 27th at 12pm EST called Navigating the Ethical Pitfalls of Social Media.  I will moderate the discussion, and the panel consists of the following legal professionals (also our guest bloggers!):

You need to be a Martindale-Hubbell Connected member to register for our webinar.  If you are not yet a member, don’t worry!  Registration is free and easy – sign up now and then come back to this post for the registration link.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

markclayson wrote onJanuary 27, 2010 at 4:23 am

Also, you’ll be able to network with some of the top voices in social media ethics and policy today as we explore the spectrum of ethical issues that affect lawyers and other business professionals, suggest practical tips for avoiding problems, and provide a framework for analyzing new situations which may arise.

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