From the category archives:

Constitutional Law

TweetWhile the Supreme Court’s recent rulings on same-sex marriage were a significant victory for the LGBT community, discrimination still exists in the courtroom. The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is currently considering whether lawyers should be able to use peremptory challenges to exclude jurors based on sexual orientation. Peremptory challenges are […]

{ 0 comments }

Tweet- From LexisNexis® Mealey’s™ Daily Legal News. A pro se prisoner’s constitutional rights were not violated by secondhand smoke from prison staff, according to a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, who said March 8 that the prisoner could have avoided the smoke by closing the window in his […]

{ 0 comments }

TweetThe recently 11th Circuit Court of Appeals recently issued a much-publicized ruling about cats. But these aren’t just any felines, they are the descendants of a six-toed cat given to Earnest Hemingway in 1935. While a legal dispute over cats may seem trivial at first blush, it actually involves some weighty legal issues, including the Commerce […]

{ 0 comments }

Tweet- From LexisNexis® Mealey’s™ Daily Legal News. The federal government’s criminal prosecution of a sales representative’s off-label promotion of a drug is unconstitutional under the First Amendment right of free speech, a panel of the Second Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals said Dec. 3 in a 2-1 ruling (United States of America v. Alfred Caronia, […]

{ 0 comments }

TweetFilmmaker Ken Burns is locked in a legal battle with the City of New York over his first Amendment rights to keep footage and research from his documentary film, The Central Park Five. The film chronicles the story of five men imprisoned for a 1989 rape of a jogger in Central Park.  All five were […]

{ 0 comments }

TweetA prisoner serving time in a Philadelphia prison is making a novel legal argument after being denied access to popular social media website Facebook. He claims his First Amendment rights have been violated. The prisoner did not seek to log on to Facebook, but rather received printouts from the site through the U.S. Mail. After […]

{ 0 comments }

TweetThe Colorado Supreme Court recently upheld the firing of a university professor, Ward Churchill, who wrote a stomach churning essay comparing the 9/11 terror victims to Adolf Eichman.  Fittingly, the court’s ruling came down on September 10 of this year, one day before the eleventh anniversary of the attack.  Ward Churchill, who had been a […]

{ 1 comment }

TweetA federal judge in Massachusetts is facing criticism after approving a request by a convicted murderer to undergo a sex-change operation while serving life in prison. The case highlights that breaking new ground in the law is sometimes extremely unpopular. As reported by the Wall Street Journal, Robert Kosilek, who now goes by the name […]

{ 0 comments }

TweetA trend over the past ten years has seen the separation of classrooms into single gender classes, based on the theory that children learn better when they are separated according to gender.  Proponents claim that it reduces violence in the classroom and fosters a better learning climate. Opponents claim that it furthers stereotypes, and they have […]

{ 0 comments }

TweetAccording to the Supreme Court, you can falsely state that you were awarded military medals because that is protected free speech under the First Amendment.  However, according to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, falsely and fraudulently wearing such medals on your chest constitutes a crime. A couple of months ago, the Supreme Court declared that […]

{ 0 comments }