CES Day 2: SMJ who are you? identity and the user

by 04g7F1nl02 on January 12, 2009 · 0 comments

in Web 2.0

Who are those that use Social Media for Business?

Jeremiah Owyang divides users of social media for business purposes into 6 groups:

* Creators – they have blogs, twitter, they are on every single network.
* Critics -
* Collectors – get all feeds and organize them
* Joiners – network is how I get business done
* Spectators – consume but don’t participate
* Inactive – I relay on personal relationships

while Carlos Hernandez gave a very interesting take on how baby boomers are digesting Social Media. Key message: baby boomers need to reach out connect online with the younger generation, that in a few years will be sitting in the important seat: you are business-savvy, they are tech-savvy, if you connect with them you can become tech-business savvy, which every job demands today: ” ‘I don’t want to be that ‘resume in monster’ , I want to meet my future employers for coffee before that; Facebook and twitter give you that ‘coffee intro meeting’”.

So how does one manage themselves online?

Chris Heuer from social media club went through his social media principles:

-    be yourself
-    be aware of surrounding, of yourself
-    be respectful
-    be a participant, give/contribute value
-    be open to hearing negative and positive
-    be courageous – be ready to be successful in one area, and fail in another.

Authenticity and genuine-uity were a hot topic: how do you maintain how do you maintain an honest, open profile when people from different groups in your life look at your profile, should or should you not keep the social separate to the professional, and what is genuine socializing. Dave Taylor did a survey with Twitter users of what is perceived as genuine:

* Spontaneity and immediate response
* Sharing something personal about yourself (v important to the personal vs professional)
* Not all business
* Don’t sugarcoat, admit failure
* Being passionate
* Who are you as a person, not who are you as an organization representative

One aspect that got different views from twitter as well as SMJ participants? you profile’s photo. What is genuine? Photo of the real person Or A symbol of you (your cat/dog/hampster/goldfish)?

As for separating social from professional? Robert Scoble gave his 2 cents to say this is a personal matter – each person should decide what are their limits of personal exposure to the professional world. Scoble, in this case, puts his bedroom as the limit, and Scoble is still the face of Microsoft, even after leaving; even was blogging not in line with Microsoft’s agenda, he managed to buy the hearts of anti-microsoft users with his genuine-uity: he was real about his passion to Microsoft and technology and that bought him a place of honor in the Social Media Hall of Fame.

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